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Family returns home after house flooded in Shelton

The Skokomish River roads near Shelton are open again now that the floodwaters have receded a bit. One family has a dilemma after being evacuated when water started coming into their home this week.  (KOMO News) 

SHELTON, Wash. -- The Skokomish River roads near Shelton are open again now that the floodwaters have receded a bit. One family has a dilemma after being evacuated when water started coming into their home this week.

Do they stay or do they go?

On Tuesday evening, 10 inches of water covered the home of Kim and Alex Morris. Kim was rescued that night. Alex stayed with the dogs but finally had to brave the high water Wednesday to evacuate with them to higher ground.

On Friday, the water was gone. But how much damage was done? The carpets were saturated. Everything on the floor got wet.

Kim says she was not that concerned about her own possessions. She was more worried about the items donated to distribute during the holidays.

She gingerly opened a plastic container with stuffed animals that they give to the elderly at Christmas time. Everything was dry. Same for the container with hundreds of plastic eggs to hand out at Easter filled with candy and other items.

Kim and Alex Morris are renters. Flood insurance is not available in this well-known flood plain. Other homes have been raised 10 feet, but Kim and Alex said government red tape has prevented the owner from doing that.

The damage is not as bad as they thought it would be. The question now is: do you rebuild or do you call it quits?

"I love this place," Alex said. "I love the neighbors. But is it really worth it? Our dogs, our safety, our security? I'm thinking not."

"What happens next time and we're sleeping when this happens and it gets higher?" Kim asked. "We're risking us and our animals at this point."

But after the place dries out they said they may want to stay after all.

"I love this home," Kim said. "My grandkids love this home."

The various government agencies from the Army Corps of Engineers, the state, the county and the Skokomish tribe have not been able to agree on how to prevent the yearly flooding without impacting the environment and fish runs.

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