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'It was very terrifying': Hawaii families react to false nuke alarm

Though the ballistic missile threat alert seemed unbelievable to Justin Hughey and Nanna Lindberg, in that moment it felt real. The couple moved to Hawaii from Washington to teach.

More harrowing stories of panic are coming out of Hawaii from local families scrambling to get to safety after a ballistic missile threat. The threat was a false alarm.

Though the ballistic missile threat alert seemed unbelievable to Justin Hughey and Nanna Lindberg, in that moment it felt real. The couple moved to Hawaii from Washington to teach.

“I got extremely terrified,” said Lindberg. “I was shaking trying to close the windows. It was very terrifying."

"When you see that, you have to treat it like the real deal,” said Hughey.

The couple warned kids playing outside their Wailuku, Hawaii, neighborhood to get inside, then they quickly grabbed their gas masks, filled their bathtubs with water and scrambled to hide in their pantry.

“We decided what the safest room was, and we called our parents to say goodbye,” said Hughey.

“If it was a nuclear missile and we got hit either we die or we survive."

After 15 minutes stuffed in the pantry, they looked out the window and saw nothing. They finally confirmed with their neighbors it was a false alarm which the governor of Hawaii blamed on an employee who pushed the wrong button.

“Even though we were somewhat prepared, it really was a wake-up call where we have to start thinking about what do we have what can we still do,” said Lindberg.

Mistake or not, the couple who moved to Hawaii to teach said they're learning in this time of escalating tensions people can never be prepared enough.

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